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20121202
20121210
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KQED (PBS) 22
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English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
to prosperity or to cut our way out of this deficit problem that we have. we're going to need more revenues. in order to do that, that starts with higher rates for the folks at the top. >> reporter: the president did say today he would consider lowering rates again for the top two percent next year as part of a broader tax overhaul. the house republican plan envisions $2.2 trillion in deficit reductions over the next decade. $800 billion would come from new revenues but with no hike in tax rates for top earners. instead the plan relies on $1.2 trillion in reduced spending including $600 billion from changes in medicare and medicaid. at the white house today, the president met with a bipartisan group of governors pressing his own plan for deficit reduction. that proposal, $1.6 trillion in revenue from tax increases on the wealthy and $600 billion in spending cuts mostly from reductions in medicare. he also wants authority to raise the debt ceiling without congressional intervention. but governors emerged afterwards treading a line between the two sides. delaware governor jack markel, a democ
will eventually get hurt by the accumulating deficit. we have too much deficit. we have to find a solution. we are forced to find a workable solution. they do not seem to have the incentive. they patched things up and come back and another sustainable solution. the more general problem is that any system that is deprived of its volatility, the system becomes very fragile. just like the economy became fragile by micromanaging. >> let me use that to segue into the text. this book -- define for me "antifragile." >> what is the opposite of fragile? they tend to say robust, solid. the opposite of fragile is something that gains from disorder. i was an options trader for a long time, half of my life. i had a name for things that were harmed by volatility. i realized that you can map fragility as something that gains from volatility. things that gain from volatility, we have to have a name different from resilience. i call them "antifragile." people make mistakes shooting for robustness and stability, things that need -- you go to the gym. people work out. they stress their body and their body gets s
of the entire group of government spending programs that are being looked at to get to deal with the deficits? >> well, before i answer that i was very interested in the way you characterized these programs as entitlements. so-called, you said, entitlements. and we think that a better term would be earned benefits. you know, i counted the letters in the word "entitlement." there are 11 letters. often people refer to entitlement as a four-letter word and it's a derogatory, derisive characterization. these are earned benefits. people pay for them while they're working, social security part "a" medicare, the hospital part. 25% of the premium for part "b." so i wish we would switch from entitlements to earned benefits, first of all. now answer your question, social security has not added a penny to the federal debt, to the deficits every year. it has a surplus. it has a surplus of $2.7 trillion. so why are we in such a rush to change a program that does not have -- is not bankrupt, has a surplus, has 22 years of solvency before it does have a serious problem and has not contributed to the federal
what i talked about in the campaign, which is a balanced, responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure the country grows. >> tom: the president rejected the proposal republicans presented him yesterday. it would cut the debt by $2.2 trillion over ten years, but would not raise taxes on america's highest earners, the biggest sticking point. the two sides seem to be allowing themselves room to bargain. the president said today he'd be open to lowering tax rates for high earners later next year as part of a broad tax reform package. and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell did not directly endorse the g.o.p. plan. for now, house speaker boehner put the ball in the president's court, releasing a statement: "the president now has an obligation to respond with a proposal that can pass both chambers of congress." >> susie: we turn tonight to other opinions on the fiscal cliff impasse. we talk with the chairman of the national governor's association, and we also hear from a leading advocate for responsible fiscal policy. we begin with g
benefits. moving to a more accurate inflation measure called the "chained c.p.i." would cut the deficit by $200 billion over ten years. supporters say the change wouldn't cut benefits. >> if we're making the change to reflect what is the real cost of living, as opposed to a different one, then you are not reducing them; you're just truing up what you should be getting. not something that-- i hate to use the term-- that might be inflated beyond what it should have been. >> reporter: this so-called technical fix will shave a quarter of a percentage point off social security's annual cost of living increase, and that difference adds up over time. some worry that will hurt the very old. >> it cuts real benefits. if somebody is getting fewer dollars in their check, that's real to them. and for people who are sliding progressively farther behind prevailing living standards, which is true of those out of the labor force for a very long time, it's about as real as it gets. >> reporter: but the change to a chained c.p.i. is easy to do, and that means it could be packaged into a deficit agreement
-author of a deficit reduction plan that neither side has previously embraced. i spoke with him a short time ago. erskine bowles, thank you so much for joining you. late this afternoon john boehner, the house speaker, sent a letter to the white house in which he said he needed to find different middle ground on this fiscal cliff issue. he particularly cited your report which he described as providing imperfect but fair middle ground as a way of breaking this political stalemate. he's saying only the president would adopt your approach that maybe this stalemate could be broken. what do you think about that? >> (laughing) well, i haven't seen the letter, as i think you know. it's nice that the speaker would give me some credit for trying to do that. but what he is referring to is when i testified before the super committee, i tried to show these guys that if they truly wanted to ghettoing that they could ghettoing at that time. and basically as an example on discretionary spending they were talking about cuts between $200-$400 billion. look, ghettoing on $300 billion. on health care between $500 b
is a balanced responsible approach to deficit reduction that can help give businesses certainty and make sure that the country grows. and unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks for example about $800 billion worth of revenues but he says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> rose: and here is the president talking about why it's essential for him that there be tax increases for the most wealthy among us. >> i don't think that the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. the issue right now that's relevant is the acknowledgment that if we're going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with the very tough cuts that we've already made and further reforms and entitlements that i'm prepared to make, that we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> rose: and the president talking about the link when our economic circumstance and our national security. >> the most important thing we do for national security though,
the president will do in terms of cuts. where are concerned about the deficit. i believe we will get there. i really do. >> you are a perennial optimist. you make everything seem sunny. we are at a stalemate. republicans do not want to raise taxes and democrats to know what to -- do not want to cut spending. >> the president has the political upper hand. if nothing happens, the tax rates do expire as is and they go up and the sequestration of takes place. he can vote -- publicly blame that on republicans to. he would have the upper hand. policy-wise east as -- he has to combat and ask for an increase in the debt ceiling. he knows that if he sours the atmosphere right now that it would be difficult for him to get an increase in the debt ceiling in a couple of months. i believe this motivation for both of us to say let's cut out all the political posturing and make a deal. we realize as professionals will have to get it done. >> what are you opposed -- why opposed?you >> taxes have been 18% of gdp. they're down now because of a question of rates but because of the economy. >> in sharing the bur
willthought to balance not be r. ways to reduce the deficit never are. but we must act together. when you look for savings, it is fair to local to the 1%. >> with multiple forecasts being downgraded, it has now become an issue about competence. they argue not only has the chancellor failed, but failed on his own terms. >> it has been completely derailed. the one test they set for themselves, balance the books and get the debt falling by 2015, that is now in tatters. >> after all, the facts and figures of the chancellor's statement -- after all of the facts and figures of the chancellor's statement, we are left with a feeling of malaise. >> you are watching bbc world news america. still to come, aero controversy at the hospital after the duchess of game birds -- the after information on the duchess of cambridge is released to two is jockeys. >> in bangkok, thousands of thais turned out to catch a glimpse of the mark on his 85th birthday in a rare public appearance prepare aero controvy at the hospital after the duchess of game birds -- the after information on the duchess of cambridge -- appear
're going to get revenues or get to the deficit number they want is to have both revenues and spending cuts. the only way to get the spending cuts and entitlements from the president they want is to give him some political revenues. >> when john boehner made his offer there were signatures of all the republican leaders on that letter, including cantor and paul ryan, viewed as a future presidential candidate among republicans. so by locking down those signatures on that $00 billion of new taxes, he's blocked those guys from opposing him. very savvy. >> did anybody phone some of the quemplets offer the budget committees? >> he did in order to demonstrate his power. gain bah boehner has been here a long time. he saw the coup attempt to speaker gingrich by members of his old party. he knows he has to hold those people together to negotiate with the president. he saw a little bit of wiggle room earlier with jim demint coming out earlier and said he thought the tax offer was an outrage. from the right you can see the speaker tamping that out with his boot. gwen: the president has not always been
for state credit in 2013. saying, "any meaningful federal deficit reduction is likely to lower state funding, forcing program elimination or backfilling." as the tax hikes and spending cuts approach, u.s. manufacturers saw business shrink last month. the institute of supply management's purchasing managers index fell unexpectedly to 49.5, down from 51.7 in october. a reading below 50 means business has fallen back into contraction. the november statistic is the lowest since july 2009. the dow fell 60, the nasdaq down eight, the s&p 500 lost six. >> susie: jeff saut says investors seem to be ignoring bad news, and this is a bullish sign. he's managing director and chief investment strategist at raymond james. so jeff, not only are you bullish but you're also calling for a pretty decent santa claus rally. tell us why? >> well, i have learned over the 42 years in this business, susie, that it's pretty tough to put stocks to the downside in the ebullient month of december. i mean it's happened but it's a pretty rare event it just seems to be the holiday sentiment tend to its lift stocks. i think
that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington's got a spending problem, not a revenue problem. >> tom: congress and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't settle the fiscal cliff issue. he's chief economist of moody's analytics. so mark falling off the fiscal cliff means bad things. how bad? >> it could be quite bad, susie. i don't think it's if we get into january and we haven't settled this but if house makers haven't nailed this down by early february, i think stock investors, bond investors will start to get very very nervous, start selling, risky businesses pull back and by the end of february when we start approaching the ceiling for the debt limit, i think we'll be back in recession. it will be a fairly severe recession. so policy makers have a few weeks but not much more than that. they have to get this together. >> susie: some people
it is not that we have authorized the spending of the money, we just don't have the money. we're running a deficit of $25 billion every week. and we >>> issue two. syrian nightmare. >> i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command. the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> president obama this week warned the president of syria, bashar al-assad not to use syria's chemical weapons against his own people. rebel syrians are waging an offensive against other syrians, largely assad's government forces. unnamed u.s. officials say that syria has even gone so far as to load the precursor ingredients of sarin, a deadly nerve gas, into the aerial bombs. whether this activity is to protect the chemicals from advancing rebel forces, or for assad to actually use them against rebel forces, is not clear. as secretary of state hillary clinton points out. >> our concerns are that an increasingly desperate assad regime mig
are the points in time when you're able to deal with some of the deficit issues -- and by the way, government is only funded through march, anyway. so regardless of the debt ceiling, there's still the issue of the fact that we have-- we have only funded government through march. there are two points, the funding of government and the debt ceiling and i would agree with you, that it's unfortunate that a 11 reg point like that has to be used. we should sit down to solve the problem. but the it's the only thing thus far that produced results -- we got the budget control act last time-- to really take our nation towards solvency. i would agree with you. i wish we could sit down and self-solve it. i think there is a majority in the hous house and senate that t to do that, but the only two negotiators that matter right now are the president and speaker boehner. and as i mentioned before-- again, i understand there are two sides of this tale-- the president is really not yet offering the kind of reforms that would make these programs solvent for the long haul so we're trying to think how do we get t
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)